Lack of housing has cost PCC millions of £’s!

Housing Development in Peterborough

A chronic shortage of affordable housing in Peterborough, has seen Peterborough City Council spend millions of pounds over the last few years, on temporary accommodation for homeless families.

The predicament has not been helped either by the Council’s mismanagement of school places i.e. closing schools like Bretton Woods etc, which has meant the need to build two new schools, such as the ones at the Manor Drive/Paston Reserve area, which resulted in a reduction in affordable homes, that was previously agreed.

The number of affordable homes built in 2015/16 fell by 52% and was the lowest number in 24 years.

A steady decline in affordable housing and squeezes on household incomes has seen the number of households local authorities have been forced to place in temporary accommodation rise by 50% since 2010.

This is bad for families and communities and expensive for the council.

A renaissance in house-building by the City Council and a Government plan to reduce the squeeze on household incomes are both needed if we are to stand any chance of solving our housing crisis, reducing homelessness and the use of temporary accommodation, and sustainably reducing the housing benefit bill.

Don’t forget, if you have a view or comment on this, please do let me know by posting below!

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Lack of housing has cost PCC millions of £’s!

Housing Development in Peterborough

A chronic shortage of affordable housing in Peterborough, has seen Peterborough City Council spend millions of pounds over the last few years, on temporary accommodation for homeless families.

The predicament has not been helped either by the Council’s mismanagement of school places i.e. closing schools like Bretton Woods etc, which has meant the need to build two new schools, such as the ones at the Manor Drive/Paston Reserve area, which resulted in a reduction in affordable homes, that was previously agreed.

The number of affordable homes built in 2015/16 fell by 52% and was the lowest number in 24 years.

A steady decline in affordable housing and squeezes on household incomes has seen the number of households local authorities have been forced to place in temporary accommodation rise by 50% since 2010.

This is bad for families and communities and expensive for the council.

A renaissance in house-building by the City Council and a Government plan to reduce the squeeze on household incomes are both needed if we are to stand any chance of solving our housing crisis, reducing homelessness and the use of temporary accommodation, and sustainably reducing the housing benefit bill.

Don’t forget, if you have a view or comment on this, please do let me know by posting below!

Previous related articles

 

AMVC and FA will run new schools at Manor Drive/Paston Reserve?

What’s this to do with?

Well the area, popularly known as Manor Drive, is presently experiencing a high volume of development.

In recent times, due to shortages in school places locally, the Tories at the Town, announced they’d be scrapping previously agreed affordable housing, in order to agree to build a new primary and secondary school, at the aforementioned location.

At a recent scrutiny committee meeting, I was told that:

“A free school bid had been made by Arthur Mellows Village College for the Paston Reserve Primary School in Sept 2016. They would also submit a free school bid for the Secondary School at Paston….”

I can now confirm that the Department for Education have announced that Arthur Mellows Village College (AMVC) in partnership with Fulbridge Academy (FA), have been successful in their bid to run the planned primary and secondary schools.

What does Darren think?

Myself and my colleague, Cllr Julia Davidson, have previously held meetings with representatives from Fulbridge Academy, who have shown an interest in being involved in the running of the primary school. But aside from that, we’ve had little or no information from anyone else.

I’m surprised that given much of the land being sold/developed is owned by the Church, that the Church of England Diocese and the Catholic Diocese didn’t fancy the idea of running at least one of the schools?

That said, I have recently requested an update from the Council’s Education Service Director.

Worth knowing…

  • According to the City Council, the intention is to open the primary school in September 2018, although this may “be deferred until September 2019 to open concurrent with the secondary school.”
  • Both schools will end up taking 420 pupils. Both schools WILL follow the national curriculum.

Additional reading …..

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